Failure to Yield Accident info

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Failure to Yield accidents attorneys in California

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) lists failure to field right of way as one of the most common moving violations for commercial truck drivers, and it is one of the specified traffic violations calculated for each carrier. When a commercial truck driver fails to yield the right of way, it often comes as a surprise to other motorists who are not prepared to make the necessary evasive maneuvers.

Many people are powerless to avoid collisions, and the impact of crashes can send motor vehicles into the paths of other automobiles or possibly force them into solitary objects such as wall. The wreckage left behind is frequently severe, and the nature of the injuries suffered can be profound.

California Failure to Yield Truck Accident Attorney

Did you sustain severe injuries or was your loved one killed in a truck accident caused by a truck driver’s failure to yield in California? You will want to have experienced legal counsel who can prove the driver’s negligence.

The May Firm has achieved multiple seven-figure settlements and verdicts for our clients. You can have us explore all of your legal options as soon as you call (844) 629-3476 or contact us online to take advantage of a free consultation.

Types of Failure to Yield

Right of way laws in California are covered under California Vehicle Code §§ 21800 – 21809. These laws hold the following:

  • California Vehicle Code § 21800(a) – The driver of a vehicle approaching an intersection must yield the right-of-way to any vehicle which has entered the intersection from a different highway.
  • California Vehicle Code § 21800(b)(1) – When two vehicles enter an intersection from different highways at the same time, the driver of the vehicle on the left must yield the right-of-way to the vehicle on their immediate right, except that the driver of any vehicle on a terminating highway must yield the right-of-way to any vehicle on the intersecting continuing highway.
  • California Vehicle Code § 21800(c) – When two vehicles enter an intersection from different highways at the same time and the intersection is controlled from all directions by stop signs, the driver of the vehicle on the left must yield the right-of-way to the vehicle on their immediate right.
  • California Vehicle Code § 21800(d)(1) – The driver of any vehicle approaching an intersection which has official traffic control signals that are inoperative must stop at the intersection, and may proceed with caution when it is safe to do so.
  • California Vehicle Code § 21800(d)(2) – When two vehicles enter an intersection from different highways at the same time, and the official traffic control signals for the intersection are inoperative, the driver of the vehicle on the left must yield the right-of-way to the vehicle on their immediate right, except that the driver of any vehicle on a terminating highway must yield the right-of-way to any vehicle on the intersecting continuing highway.
  • California Vehicle Code § 21801(a) – The driver of a vehicle intending to turn to the left or to complete a U-turn upon a highway, or to turn left into public or private property, or an alley, must yield the right-of-way to all vehicles approaching from the opposite direction which are close enough to constitute a hazard at any time during the turning movement, and must continue to yield the right-of-way to the approaching vehicles until the left turn or U-turn can be made with reasonable safety.
  • California Vehicle Code § 21801(b) – A driver having yielded as prescribed in California Vehicle Code § 21801(a), and having given a signal when and as required by this code, may turn left or complete a U-turn, and the drivers of vehicles approaching the intersection or the entrance to the property or alley from the opposite direction must yield the right-of-way to the turning vehicle.
  • California Vehicle Code § 21802(a) – The driver of any vehicle approaching a stop sign at the entrance to, or within, an intersection must stop as required by Section 22450. The driver must then yield the right-of-way to any vehicles which have approached from another highway, or which are approaching so closely as to constitute an immediate hazard, and must continue to yield the right-of-way to those vehicles until they can proceed with reasonable safety.
  • California Vehicle Code § 21802(b) – A driver having yielded as prescribed in California Vehicle Code § 21802(a) may proceed to enter the intersection, and the drivers of all other approaching vehicles must yield the right-of-way to the vehicle entering or crossing the intersection.
  • California Vehicle Code § 21803(a) – The driver of any vehicle approaching any intersection which is controlled by a yield right-of-way sign must, upon arriving at the sign, yield the right-of-way to any vehicles which have entered the intersection, or which are approaching on the intersecting highway close enough to constitute an immediate hazard, and must continue to yield the right-of-way to those vehicles until they can proceed with reasonable safety.
  • California Vehicle Code § 21803(b) – A driver having yielded as prescribed in California Vehicle Code § 21803(a) may proceed to enter the intersection, and the drivers of all other approaching vehicles must yield the right-of-way to the vehicle entering or crossing the intersection.
  • California Vehicle Code § 21804(a) – The driver of any vehicle about to enter or cross a highway from any public or private property, or from an alley, must yield the right-of-way to all traffic, as defined in Section 620, approaching on the highway close enough to constitute an immediate hazard, and must continue to yield the right-of-way to that traffic until they can proceed with reasonable safety.
  • California Vehicle Code § 21804(b) – A driver having yielded as prescribed in California Vehicle Code § 21804(a) may proceed to enter or cross the highway, and the drivers of all other vehicles approaching on the highway must yield the right-of-way to the vehicle entering or crossing the intersection.
  • California Vehicle Code § 21805(b) – The driver of any vehicle must yield the right-of-way to any horseback rider who is crossing the highway at any designated equestrian crossing which is marked by signs as prescribed in subdivision (a).
  • California Vehicle Code § 21806 – Upon the immediate approach of an authorized emergency vehicle which is sounding a siren and which has at least one lighted lamp exhibiting red light that is visible, under normal atmospheric conditions, from a distance of 1,000 feet to the front of the vehicle, the surrounding traffic must, except as otherwise directed by a traffic officer, yield the right-of-way and must immediately drive to the right-hand edge or curb of the highway, clear of any intersection, and thereupon must stop and remain stopped until the authorized emergency vehicle has passed. A person driving a vehicle in an exclusive or preferential use lane must exit that lane immediately upon determining that the exit can be accomplished with reasonable safety. The operator of every street car must immediately stop the street car, clear of any intersection, and remain stopped until the authorized emergency vehicle has passed. All pedestrians upon the highway must proceed to the nearest curb or place of safety and remain there until the authorized emergency vehicle has passed.
  • California Vehicle Code § 21809(a) – A person driving a vehicle on a freeway approaching a stationary authorized emergency vehicle that is displaying emergency lights, a stationary tow truck that is displaying flashing amber warning lights, or a stationary marked Department of Transportation vehicle that is displaying flashing amber warning lights, must approach with due caution and, before passing in a lane immediately adjacent to the authorized emergency vehicle, tow truck, or Department of Transportation vehicle, absent other direction by a peace officer, proceed to make a lane change into an available lane not immediately adjacent to the authorized emergency vehicle, tow truck, or Department of Transportation vehicle, with due regard for safety and traffic conditions, if practicable and not prohibited by law, or slow to a reasonable and prudent speed that is safe for existing weather, road, and vehicular or pedestrian traffic conditions.

Commercial truck drivers may be ticketed for any one of these failures to yield that causes a traffic accident.

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Types of Failure to Yield Truck Accident Injuries

When a truck driver fails to yield, the resulting collision is almost always full-force. This type of impact can frequently lead to very severe injuries.

Many people will require extensive medical care, and returning to work can be an issue that some victims will struggle with for the remainders of their lives. Common injuries in failure to yield truck accidents can include, but are not limited to:

  • Spinal cord injuries
  • Neck injuries
  • Fractures
  • Burn injuries
  • Lacerations
  • Paralysis
  • Muscle strains
  • Internal organ injuries
  • Sprains

A truck driver’s failure to yield could very well cause a fatal accidents. The family of the person killed by a failure to yield can file a wrongful death lawsuit against all negligent parties.

Contact a Failure to Yield Truck Accident Lawyer in California

If you suffered serious injuries or your loved one was killed in a truck accident in California caused by a truck driver’s failure to yield, get legal help as soon as possible. Contact the May Firm right now.

We will come to your hospital room or home by request. Call (844) 629-3476 or contact us online to set up a free consultation.

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